Common Training Principles/Systems

strength

 

Common Training Principles/Systems

 

HOW MANY REPS AND HOW MUCH REST BETWEEN SETS?

If your clients goal is Strength & Power: 4-6 reps– rest 3-4 minutes between sets.
If your clients goal is Size (hypertrophy): 8-10 reps– rest 1-2 minutes between sets.
If your clients goal is Tone & Endurance: 12-15 reps 1-1.30 mins rest between sets
If your clients goal is Endurance & Fat Burn: (or to “get cut”)- 20-25 reps– rest 1 minute between sets.

For people who want to increase their endurance, do 20-25 reps. This rep range is great for people who are overweight (ENDOMORPHS), higher than 20% body fat. You should rest only 1 minute between each set. This pace will help you drop body fat and increase your endurance and energy level.

For people who want to increase their strength and endurance, as well as tone up, do 12-15 reps. These are the people who want to be firm without being bulky. Rest 2 minutes between sets.

For people who are preparing for a contest or who want to keep their size and strength, but wish to drop body fat (“get cut”).  Add a set of 20-25 reps for each body part. If this isn’t enough add one set per exercise.

HOW MANY SETS SHOULD I PERFORM?

Large muscles (quads, hams, lats, chest, abs) are capable of 6-9 sets without overtraining. Advanced bodybuilders should perform 1-3 sets per exercise and 1-3 exercises per muscle group. Small muscles (calves, shoulders, biceps, triceps, traps, forearms) are capable of no more than 6 sets without overtraining). Three sets per exercise is a good rule of thumb.

REPETITIONS AND MUSCLES FIBERS

If you work one set at 4-6 reps, one set at 12-15 reps, and one set at 20-25 reps, you get complete work of all muscle components: Red, White, and Pink Fibers.

WHICH MUSCLES SHOULD I WORK FIRST?

Work weak links and stabilizers first. Because the largest muscles require the most energy to work, you usually start with the largest muscles and work toward the smallest. For example, you would probably work your quadriceps before your calves.

CONFUSE YOUR MUSCLES TO PROMOTE GROWTH

Change your routine and order of exercises, reps, weight & rest schedules. Your muscles will adapt to any set routine or schedule. Exercises that work the muscles at different angles stimulate the muscle differently and ensure that every motor unit fires. For example, you could substitute incline dumbbell curls for straight bar bicep curls.

FOR HARD GAINERS

For hard gainers,(ECTOMORPHS), people who have a hard time gaining muscle mass or strength, do 3 sets of 6 reps max weight. Rest a minimum of 3 minutes between each set.

INJURY WARNING:

Doing one set to failure per muscle group or using negatives or forced reps are not recommended for any except the most advanced lifters due to the potential for injury.  Beginners will not have the experienced technique or knowledge to be able to cope effectively
Ensure that you advise ALL clients of the importance of not overtraining.  This can lead to injury.  All muscle, tendon, ligament injuries are painful and overtraining or overloading can lead to injuries as severe as muscle separation which in turn can stop a person being able to train properly for quite a few months.

Safety is always the first concern of a fitness instructor

VARIATIONS IN TRAINING PLANS

Drop Sets
1. Choose a weight that you can complete a desired number of reps with, then drop to a weight with which you can again complete the same number of reps. with no rest in
between. For example, if you can do 6-8 lateral raises with 30 lbs. drop to 20 lbs and do 6-8 again.
2. Choose a weight that you can do in a lower rep range, then drop to weight that you can do in a higher rep range with no rest. For example, if you can do 6-8 lateral raises with 30 lbs. drop to 15 lbs. and do 15 reps.

Double Drop Sets
1. Choose a weight that you can complete a desired number of reps with, then drop to a weight with which you can again complete the same number of reps, then drop the weight yet again and complete the same number of reps. with no rest in between. For example, if you can do 6-8 lateral raises with 30 lbs. drop to 20 lbs and do 6-8 again, then drop to 10 lbs and do 6-8 again.
2. Choose a weight that you can do in a lower rep range, then drop to weight that you can do in a higher rep range with no rest. For example, if you can do 6-8 lateral raises with 30 lbs. drop to 15 lbs. and do 15 reps, then drop to 10 lbs and do 15 more reps.

Descending Sets
In descending sets (or single sided pyramid) training, you begin by doing a fixed number of repetitions with a heavy weight then immediately progress to the next set and perform the same number of repetitions (except with a lighter weight). Repeat this process a few times. This high intensity training can be very effective if used occasionally (if you did it regularly, you would become over-trained).

Giant Sets
Complete two or three different exercises for the same muscle group with no rest in between. This enables you to isolate individual muscles from within the muscle group (by using different exercises to work the muscle group from different angles thus stressing different areas of the muscle to ensure complete enervation of the muscle tissue). For example: Incline bench press stresses the upper pectorals, decline bench press stresses the lower pectorals, and flat bench stressing the middle.

Super Sets
A “set” in which you alternate between two different exercises (like bicep curl and tricep pushdowns) until all sets are completed.

Forced Reps
When a partner assists you to complete a rep that you could not complete on your own.  This is a dangerous method and not as effective as you might think. Any time you  can push your muscle past total failure there is potential for injury. And when working past 100% your body has great difficulty recovering.

Rest Pause
Between heavy reps pause 10 seconds. Repeat until 4-6 reps are completed.

COMMON TRAINING ROUTINES

One Day Split: Work upper body, then take one day off, work lower
body, then take one day off. This is a good routine for hard gainers or clients with slow recovery

Two Day Split: Work 2 consecutive days, then take one day off. Work upper body on day One, work lower body on day Two. Then take day three off. Repeat.

Push-Pull Routine: Work 2 consecutive days, then take one day off (or you could just work out every other day). On day one you work the “pushing” muscles (triceps, chest, shoulders) then on day two you work the “pulling” muscles (biceps, back). Take day three off.

Intermediate Antagonistic muscle group workout.  Upper body/ lower body split.

Circuit : Pushing- Pulling- Pressing: Works cardiovascular system as well as muscular system. It involves large muscle groups and increases fat burning potential. Keep reps high (20-25) and do not rest between exercises. Your objective is to complete all exercises in your circuit within a certain time limit.

Expanded Circuit: A slightly more advanced version of Circuit training. Works smaller muscle groups more intensely.

DON’T WORK THE SAME MUSCLE TWO DAYS IN A ROW

The basic philosophy behind these routines is to work related muscles (muscles that synergistically assist one another during a lift) on the same day to ensure that they are given enough recovery time between workouts. For example, you wouldn’t want to bench press (which works the pectorals AND triceps) on Monday and then do tricep push downs on Tuesday–your triceps need a day off to grow stronger!

Always advise clients on the importance of rest days.  If they want to see proper development they have to give their muscles time to rest and grow.  If a client is in every day do not be afraid to go and advise them.  It is then up to them how they wish you train but you have done your best as an instructor.

Remember, training, while hard work, should be fun.  Ensure you convey that attitude to your clients.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Youtube